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Raise Application Error Oracle Example

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In the above example, a trigger has been created in the schema A to stop any modification to the EMPLOYEES table's data during the weekend. If the company has zero earnings, the predefined exception ZERO_DIVIDE is raised. Figure 10-1, Figure 10-2, and Figure 10-3 illustrate the basic propagation rules. Consider the following example: BEGIN ... click site

In that case, we change the value that needs to be unique and continue with the next loop iteration. An application can call raise_application_error only from an executing stored subprogram (or method). Consider the following example: DECLARE pe_ratio NUMBER(3,1); BEGIN DELETE FROM stats WHERE symbol = 'XYZ'; BEGIN ---------- sub-block begins SELECT price / NVL(earnings, 0) INTO pe_ratio FROM stocks WHERE symbol = In the following example, you pass positive numbers and so get unwanted results: DECLARE err_msg VARCHAR2(100); BEGIN /* Get all Oracle error messages. */ FOR err_num IN 1..9999 LOOP err_msg :=

Difference Between Raise And Raise_application_error In Oracle

But the enclosing block cannot reference the name PAST_DUE, because the scope where it was declared no longer exists. You can also perform a sequence of DML operations where some might fail, and process the exceptions only after the entire operation is complete, as described in "Handling FORALL Exceptions with INFORMATIONAL: Messages for conditions that do not have an effect on performance or correctness, but that you might want to change to make the code more maintainable, such as unreachable code Do you even need to use dynamic SQL?

You can use the pragma EXCEPTION_INIT to associate exception names with other Oracle error codes that you can anticipate. You can avoid unhandled exceptions by coding an OTHERS handler at the topmost level of every PL/SQL program. For example, PL/SQL raises the predefined exception NO_DATA_FOUND if a SELECT INTO statement returns no rows. Raise Application Error In Oracle Triggers END; Omitting the exception name in a RAISE statement--allowed only in an exception handler--reraises the current exception.

Example 10-6 Using RAISE to Force a User-Defined Exception DECLARE out_of_stock EXCEPTION; number_on_hand NUMBER := 0; BEGIN IF number_on_hand < 1 THEN RAISE out_of_stock; -- raise an exception that we defined For information on managing errors when using BULK COLLECT, see "Handling FORALL Exceptions with the %BULK_EXCEPTIONS Attribute". Raising Exceptions with the RAISE Statement PL/SQL blocks and subprograms should raise an exception only when an error makes it undesirable or impossible to finish processing. For user-defined exceptions, SQLCODE returns +1 and SQLERRM returns the message: User-Defined Exception.

In the following example, if the SELECT INTO statement raises ZERO_DIVIDE, you cannot resume with the INSERT statement: DECLARE pe_ratio NUMBER(3,1); BEGIN DELETE FROM stats WHERE symbol = 'XYZ'; SELECT price Raise_application_error Sqlerrm EXCEPTION WHEN NO_DATA_FOUND THEN -- catches all 'no data found' errors Exceptions improve readability by letting you isolate error-handling routines. Example 10-16 Using the DBMS_WARNING Package to Display Warnings -- When warnings disabled, the following procedure compiles with no warnings CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE unreachable_code AS x CONSTANT BOOLEAN := TRUE; If the transaction succeeds, commit, then exit from the loop.

Raise_application_error(-20001

It enforces a business rule that new employees cannot be hired in the future. The message begins with the Oracle error code. Difference Between Raise And Raise_application_error In Oracle Associating a PL/SQL Exception with a Number: Pragma EXCEPTION_INIT To handle error conditions (typically ORA- messages) that have no predefined name, you must use the OTHERS handler or the pragma EXCEPTION_INIT. Oracle Raise Home Book List Contents Index Master Index Feedback Search BC Oracle Sites HomeE-mail Us Oracle Articles New Oracle Articles Oracle TrainingOracle Tips Oracle ForumClass Catalog

Oracle technology is changing and we strive to update our BC Oracle support information. http://vealcine.com/error-in/raise-application-error-in-oracle-pl-sql.php When you see an error stack, or sequence of error messages, the one on top is the one that you can trap and handle. Whenever a message is displayed using RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR, all previous transactions which are not committed within the PL/SQL Block are rolled back automatically (i.e. In the latter case, PL/SQL returns an unhandled exception error to the host environment. Raise_application_error Parameters

But, if the need arises, you can use a locator variable to track statement execution, as follows: DECLARE stmt INTEGER := 1; -- designates 1st SELECT statement BEGIN SELECT ... However, other user-defined exceptions must be raised explicitly by RAISE statements. Also, if a stored subprogram fails with an unhandled exception, PL/SQL does not roll back database work done by the subprogram. http://vealcine.com/error-in/raise-application-error-in-oracle-with-example.php Again, a single exception handler can trap all division-by-zero errors, bad array subscripts, and so on.

In the latter case, PL/SQL returns an unhandled exception error to the host environment. Raise_application_error In Oracle 11g WHEN OTHERS THEN -- optional handler sequence_of_statements3 END; To catch raised exceptions, you write exception handlers. In Example 10-5, you call raise_application_error if an error condition of your choosing happens (in this case, if the current schema owns less than 1000 tables): Example 10-5 Raising an Application

raise_application_error(-20001,'Salary is high'); 10.

For example: NO_DATA_FOUND and ZERO_DIVIDE are called Named System exceptions. WHEN OTHERS THEN -- handles all other errors ROLLBACK; END; -- exception handlers and block end here The last example illustrates exception handling, not the effective use of INSERT statements. DECLARE 3. Raise Application Error In Sql Server Though they share the same name, the two past_due exceptions are different, just as the two acct_num variables share the same name but are different variables.

Exceptions declared in a block are considered local to that block and global to all its sub-blocks. Redeclaring Predefined Exceptions Remember, PL/SQL declares predefined exceptions globally in package STANDARD, so you need not declare them yourself. BEGIN 6. my review here INVALID_CURSOR 01001 -1001 A program attempts a cursor operation that is not allowed, such as closing an unopened cursor.

RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR is part of package DBMS_STANDARD, and as with package STANDARD, you do not need to qualify references to it. That way, an exception handler written for the predefined exception can process other errors, as the following example shows: DECLARE acct_type INTEGER := 7; BEGIN IF acct_type NOT IN (1, 2, Exceptions Raised in Declarations Exceptions can be raised in declarations by faulty initialization expressions. Special discounts should be provided.

Also, it can use the pragma EXCEPTION_INIT to map specific error numbers returned by raise_application_error to exceptions of its own, as the following Pro*C example shows: EXEC SQL EXECUTE /* Execute Before starting the transaction, mark a savepoint. Scope Rules for PL/SQL Exceptions You cannot declare an exception twice in the same block. IF number_on_hand < 1 THEN RAISE out_of_stock; END IF; EXCEPTION WHEN out_of_stock THEN -- handle the error END; You can also raise a predefined exception explicitly.

Each handler consists of a WHEN clause, which specifies an exception, followed by a sequence of statements to be executed when that exception is raised.